Blog dedicated entirely to the beat generation.

“But why think about that when all the golden lands ahead of you and all kinds of unforseen events wait lurking to surprise you and make you glad you're alive to see?”

Jack Kerouac wandering along East 7th Street after visiting Burroughs at our pad, passing statue of Congressman Samuel “Sunset” Cox, “The Letter Carrier’s Friend” in Tompkins Square toward corner of Avenue A, Lower East Side.  He’s making a Dostoevsky mad-face or Russian basso be-bop Om, then involved with The Subterraneans, just walking around the neighborhood, pencils and notebook in the wool shirt-pocket, Manhattan Fall 1953. (Ginsberg Caption) c. Allen Ginsberg Estate.

Jack Kerouac wandering along East 7th Street after visiting Burroughs at our pad, passing statue of Congressman Samuel “Sunset” Cox, “The Letter Carrier’s Friend” in Tompkins Square toward corner of Avenue A, Lower East Side.  He’s making a Dostoevsky mad-face or Russian basso be-bop Om, then involved with The Subterraneans, just walking around the neighborhood, pencils and notebook in the wool shirt-pocket, Manhattan Fall 1953. (Ginsberg Caption) c. Allen Ginsberg Estate.


From left to right: unknown woman, Jerry Newman and Jack Kerouac

From left to right: unknown woman, Jerry Newman and Jack Kerouac

“…I didn’t bring my peremptory tone to bear in regard to what you’d just said about the unnecessariness of sleep but only, only, mind you, because of the fact that I absolutely, simply, purely and without any whatevers have to sleep now, I mean, man, my eyes are closing, they’re redhot, sore, tired, beat…”
Jack Kerouac (via quoteallthethings)

Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969)

In a sense, I’m mad (and withdrawn from life) while they’re sane, human, normal - but in another sense, I speak from the depths of a vision of truth when I say that this continual jockeying for position is the enemy of life in itself. It may be life, ‘life is like that,’ it may be human and true, but it’s also the death-part of life, and our purpose after all is to live and be true. We’ll see.


Jack Kerouac at Staten Island Ferry wharf, we used to wander night time docksides under Manhattan’s bridges & through truck parkinglots along East River singing rawbone blues, Leadbelly’s “Black Girl”, “Eli, Eli”, chanting Poe’s “Annabelle Lee” & shouting Hart Crane’s “O harp and altar of the fury fused”… and “Atlantis” to Brooklyn Bridge’s traffic spanned above.  Time of his Doctor Sax and The Subterraneans—New York Fall 1953. 

Jack Kerouac at Staten Island Ferry wharf, we used to wander night time docksides under Manhattan’s bridges & through truck parkinglots along East River singing rawbone blues, Leadbelly’s “Black Girl”, “Eli, Eli”, chanting Poe’s “Annabelle Lee” & shouting Hart Crane’s “O harp and altar of the fury fused”… and “Atlantis” to Brooklyn Bridge’s traffic spanned above.  Time of his Doctor Sax and The SubterraneansNew York Fall 1953. 

Smile though your heart is aching
Smile even though it’s breaking
When there are clouds in the sky, you’ll get by
If you smile through your fear and sorrow
Smile and maybe tomorrow
You’ll see the sun come shining through for you (x

“When all of the family was stilled in sleep, when the streetlamp a few paces from the house shone at night and made grotesque shadows of the trees upon the house, when the river sighed off into the darkness, when the trains hooted on their way to Montreal far upriver, when the winds swished in the soft treeleaves and something knocked and rattled on the old barn, you could stand in the road and look at this home and know that there is nothing more haunting than a house at night when the family is asleep, something strangely tragic, something beautiful forever.”
Jack Kerouac, The Town and the City (via sarcolinedream)

Allen Ginsberg & Neal Cassady (x)

→ City Lights Book Store, San Francisco, 1965

themaninthegreenshirt:

William S. Burroughs on drug dealing, 1964
1. Never give anything away for nothing.
2. Never give more than you have to (always catch the buyer hungry and always make him wait).
3. Always take back everything if you possibly can.

themaninthegreenshirt:

William S. Burroughs on drug dealing, 1964

1. Never give anything away for nothing.

2. Never give more than you have to (always catch the buyer hungry and always make him wait).

3. Always take back everything if you possibly can.